Flying in for Formula One? Here’s how to Keep your Low Back Feeling Good while you’re in Austin

Flying in for Formula One? Here’s how to Keep your Low Back Feeling Good while you’re in Austin

So Formula One is coming to the great city of Austin, Texas and there will be many people flying in from out of the country to see the races. These long flights can do a number on the body and especially the low back. There are a great number of things that can contribute to and/or cause low back pain, but today I’d like to focus on one that commonly affects people having to sit through long flights.

I rarely see a patient with low back pain whose “hip flexors” are not at least partially involved in their symptoms. So what are the hip flexors? And how can they cause back pain? I think this is most easily explained with a video …  (more…)

Injury Prevention for Walking/Running Programs – presentation for RunTex ATX TRAINING groups

Injury Prevention for Walking/Running Programs – presentation for RunTex ATX TRAINING groups

Last Saturday, I had the privilege of working with the RunTex ATX TRAINING groups and providing some information about avoiding injuries as they work toward their inspiring goals. More specifically, I taught about hip muscles weaknesses that are predisposing factors to many back, hip, and knee injuries I treat in the clinic. We covered:

  1. How specific Hip muscle weakness can lead to different types of injuries
  2. How anyone can test themselves to see if they have these issues
  3. Some simple exercises that can be done to strengthen the muscles and avoid injury (more…)
I Have a Crick in My Neck … Can you Help with that?

I Have a Crick in My Neck … Can you Help with that?

I occasionally get the above question, and the short answer is, “Yes, of course.” What people call a “crick in the neck” can come from a few different things, but in my experience, the majority of these painful scenarios occurs when the tissue surrounding a neck joint (called the joint capsule) gets pinched inside the joint. This can happen during sudden head movements, while lifting objects, and also when you sleep with your neck in an awkward position. The joint capsules have a lot of nerve endings and are very sensitive. When this occurs, the reaction of the muscles in the neck is to tighten up and protect the area, which is why a “crick in the neck” almost always has muscle spasms associated with it. These spasms add to the painful, stiff, debilitating condition that, for some, will go away within a few days but for many others will leave some level of tightness and pain for months. This can ultimately turn into a chronically stiff and often painful neck. (more…)

Pin It on Pinterest