Why do I have neck pain when I’m at my office desk?

Why do I have neck pain when I’m at my office desk?

In today’s FAQ video, we answer the question “What do I have neck pain when I’m at my desk?” Watch the video below to hear our expert physical therapists explain what’s behind your pain. Leave any questions you may have in the comments section below.

If you are dealing with neck pain and would like to know how we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

If it’s after hours and you’d like to request a call with one of our Austin-area physical therapists, click here.

Or click here to send us an email.

What do I have neck pain when I’m at my desk?

I recently had a treatment by my therapist at Carter Physiotherapy for a chronic stiff neck issue that has plagued me for over 5 years. At the beginning of the treatment it was painful to turn my head from side to side and I could not begin to try and look back over my shoulder due to pain and stiffness.

After several minutes of treatment, on either side of my neck and into my shoulders, I experienced a range of motion that was greatly improved and the pain had subsided. They also gave me extensive instructions on three different types of stretching exercises and how exactly to perform the motion as well as how long to hold the stretch in order to keep the problem from returning.

I plan to return to Carter Physiotherapy to continue to work out the joint and muscle tension and stiffness that has built up over the years.

VICKY B,  KYLE, TX

 

Video Transcription

[Please excuse grammatical errors due to the conversational nature of the video]:

Why does my neck hurt when I’m at my desk?

Generally, there would be many reasons why people’s necks hurt at their desk.

It could be just the setup of the desk but overall, humans are not designed to sit for hours on end despite tending to do that.There’s a study done a couple of years ago that describes the cost of sitting and how it now exceeds the cost of treating smoking. It is also really rare now to see people smoking. .

Who does that, right?

We sit way too much. So we try to help people at this clinic really try to figure out great solutions so we can help people optimize  their work spaces. For instance, we encourage people to go and take pictures of their work spaces and redesign them to be as ergonomically efficient as possible because that makes a big difference. This is especially true if you’re going to spend 8- 12 hours a day like some people do.

AC Joint Separation – Pain Free in 10 Minutes with Manual Therapy in Austin

AC Joint Separation – Pain Free in 10 Minutes with Manual Therapy in Austin

Many doctors and physical therapists claim there’s not much you can do for an AC joint separation. Others believe strengthening the shoulder and perhaps surgery could remove your pain. However, both of these assumptions are unfortunately a common misconception. As you’ll see in the video below, hands-on manual therapy techniques can get rid of AC joint pain. In addition, they can improve shoulder mobility limitations caused by this injury quite quickly.

If you’ve had an AC injury or strain that is still bothering you, call or text us at (512) 693-8849. We can schedule a free on-site consultation with one of our physical therapy experts.

AC Joint Separation Pain Relief Technique

Dr. Carter is an excellent PT. His evaluation was thorough, he explained all of the issues affecting my shoulder, and laid out a cohesive plan of how to address these issues to improve my range of motion. The combination of manual therapyand home exercise have resulted in improved range and I feel empowered to continue this progress. Thank you for the excellent care.

WILLIAM M, AUSTIN TX

To find out if our Austin-area physical therapy clinic might be able to get you the same great results Max experienced in the video, click here to request a call with one of the expert physical therapists at Carter PT.

Frozen Shoulder Treatment—External Rotation Mobilization with Belt

Frozen Shoulder Treatment—External Rotation Mobilization with Belt

If you’re tired of chronic shoulder pain and stiffness, discover how physical therapy can help. To request a phone call to speak with one of the physical therapists in our Austin office, click here.

Check out how proper manual therapy and stretching techniques, under the guidance of a professional, can bring you back to the healthy, pain-free life you deserve. 

Treatment for Frozen Shoulder—External Rotation Mobilization

In 2008, I was referred by my General Practitioner to a sports medicine physician for a worsening condition with my left shoulder. Over a period of about 18 months my shoulder became more and more painful and inflexible. I could not reach behind my back or easily put on a shirt at that point.

The sports medicine physician suspected a torn rotator cuff and ordered two different MRI’s – one without contrast and then one with contrast dye.  The tests confirmed that it was NOT a rotator cuff issue and I was referred to a another sports medicine doctor – a shoulder specialist at a large prestigious sports medicine practice in Austin.

The new doctor took one look at my shoulder and declared that I had bursitis and proceeded to give me a cortisone injection (so painful I passed out in his office) and predicted I would be cured by morning.This prediction proved to be wrong and he sent me to his in-house Physical Therapist for the traditional shoulder exercises to see what would happen.

I eventually shared my saga with my friend at Carter Physical Therapy who listened to my story and immediately suspected that I had a condition called a Frozen Shoulder. He explained that he had recently studied some innovative treatments for this frustrating condition and offered to treat me.  He began a series of manual adjustment and massage treatments on my shoulder about once a week. Within six weeks I was pain free and had regained normal mobility in the shoulder and two years later no symptoms have returned.

The therapists at Carter Physiotherapy were knowledgeable and dramatically more effective than the two specialists I saw. Their treatment actually fixed the problem.They have a kind and compassionate bedside manner and you know the first time you meet them that they really care about the wellbeing of their patients. You are truly in good hands when you put yourself in their care.

 
MARK L,  AUSTIN, TX

If you are dealing with shoulder pain and would like to know if we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

Or you’d rather not speak on the phone, you can click here to send us an email.

Video Transcription

(please excuse grammatical errors and the conversational nature of the transcription):

“Okay, so this is a lot of moving parts. You got to get your belts set up such that I like it where you don’t have to have your foot on the ground but to be able to have my foot stable on the ground. So this needs to be lock down the table height such that the arm can rest in your leg if necessary.

This is long enough to where it reaches down just almost to the ground there. You are setting it up right in anterior side of the humerus so that you can create a posterior guide. The idea is what kind of angle attraction and what kind of glides we do to make it pain free to go to ingrain external rotation with none of these but you gotta ingrain it hurts her and that’s probably just gonna flare up. So if we add the posterior kinda inferior glide a little inferior and a little bit angled towards me because we know that the point of the joint is not AP but it’s actually the escaption plain.

So we keep escaption plan in mind, you pull down, out toward yourself and a little bit and obviously posterior sometimes that alone you can take on the ingrain with little pain. What we found with her is that we need to add a little traction as well. So through the form with my right hand here and I’m holding this in place so then it doesn’t slide off the position. You add the traction and ingrain. Ask the patient about the pain.

And that now I can either decide to do progressive repetition stretches of the capsule or if you want to hold and just do a long hold, you need to keep monitoring, making sure that it remains pain free because of the long hold obviously or multiple repetitions where there is even smaller amount of pain as probably gonna flare them up. But there’s a great thing to do for really shoulder that stiff especially that hits but especially escapsulated shoulder.”

Trouble Looking Over Your Shoulder? This Technique Will Help: Upper Thoracic Joint Mobilization with Patient Movement

Trouble Looking Over Your Shoulder? This Technique Will Help: Upper Thoracic Joint Mobilization with Patient Movement

We make a ton of training videos for our staff and other PTs around the world. Occasionally we share them on our blog so those suffering needlessly can see how our hands-on physical therapy helps others to get back to the active lifestyles they want and deserve. This video shows an example of techniques for Upper Thoracic Joint Mobilization with Patient Movement. This might be a great option for you if you’re having trouble looking over your shoulder.

If you have pain when you are looking over your shoulder and would like to know how we can help, call us at (512) 693-8849.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve been seeing my therapist at Carter PT every other week for about 5 months. I’ve had ongoing, significant pain and discomfort with my shoulder, neck and back for over 3 years. I had been to other PTs, tried Airrosti, got massages—nothing has been nearly as helpful as my time with him. I feel he actually listens to me and really cares about me as a patient. He takes a holistic approach—examining and working with the entire body, since everything is so interconnected. He also helps to identify bad habits in day-to-day life, and form a plan to correct these to eventually stop these recurring pains from persisting or returning.

Each session is a totally personalized and hands-on experience. He spends most of the hour-long session doing manual therapy and will give a few meaningful exercises for you to do on your own—without overwhelming you with a laundry list of them.

After trying multiple Physical Therapy places that accepted my insurance and having negative to incredibly negative experiences at each of them (30 short minutes of people so obviously checked out, attention divided, giving me some exercise worksheets and sending me on my way, etc.), I decided I’d go see a PT that doesn’t accept insurance in hopes that I’d get better care. Best decision ever.

This is the first time in 3 years that I feel like I have an understanding what’s going on in my body and what we’re doing to solve the problem. After 5 months, my pain has significantly decreased, and I’m continuing to chip away at it with my therapist at Carter PT.

SARAH H, AUSTIN TX

If it’s after hours and you’d like to schedule a call with one of our physical therapists Click Here. Or you can click here to send us an email.

Upper Thoracic Joint Mobilization Video Transcription

(please excuse grammatical errors and the conversational nature of the transcription):

“We are going to work on some of these joints along here to see if it relieves the pain. Ask the patient to look to the left slowly. Do a left rotation of T1 on T2, working on the spinous process and holding to the side while blocking the lower spinous process.

After that, the patient resumes looking directly forward.

As we move the segment down, do that rotation again, holding it for a second or longer, and then come back to the middle.

Then the patient looks again to the left—and ask if it has changed anything to the symptoms there.

We should make sure that all the issues with both joints and soft tissue are improving because these kinds of issues sometimes come back when there are residual muscle spasms going.”

Soft Tissue Mobilization for neck pain – Don’t forget about the triceps

Soft Tissue Mobilization for neck pain – Don’t forget about the triceps

We make a ton of training videos for our staff and other PTs around the world. Occasionally, we also share them on our blog so those suffering needlessly can see how our hands-on manual therapy techniques can help  get them back to the active lifestyles they want and deserve.

If you are dealing with pain and would like to know how we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

Below is one such video showing an example of a soft tissue mobilization technique to address neck pain.

Soft Tissue Mobilization for neck pain – Don’t forget about the triceps!

 

 

It is my pleasure to write a review about Jarod Carter at Carter Physiotherapy… I have no clue how I injured myself—but I have had a high level of neck, shoulder, and arm pain for at least a month before I started seeing Jarod. The pain was so bad I lost all my energy and had some sleeping issues.

My X-ray showed nothing and MRI showed mild herniation of cervical 3, which is nothing serious. However, I am miserable and also have a huge responsibility of taking care of my 37-year-old disabled daughter. After one call, Mary, Jarod’s office manager, got me in to see Jarod the next day.

I’m a nurse so I’m trained to assess people in other fields of medicine. Simply put, after my first visit I was so impressed with Jarod’s training, skill, thoroughness, and professionalness as well. Jarod basically is as good as it gets, and I feel blessed to have found him.

Over the last six weeks Jarod has seen me twice weekly and I have improved everytime he works on me and advises me. After 6-7 weeks I’m almost completely pain free. I’m now seeing Jarod on a maintainence basis. He has helped me with my posture, added a cervicle pillow that has improved my neck support while I sleep and given me many helpful home stretches to keep my issues at bay. Jarod also has spent a lot of time improving issues I have with being a caretaker and how I can avoid injury.

Jarod Carter is just the best and as a professional I highly recommend him and his clinic.

PAM M, AUSTIN TX

If you’d like to schedule a call with one of our expert physical therapists Click Here. Or you can click here to send us an email.

Video Transcription

(please excuse grammatical errors and the conversational nature of the transcription):

“We are working on the traps, the infraspinatus area, and the posterior area  from the deltoid to the triceps. A lot of times with these neck issues, there’s tricep tightness. Likewise, there may be lateral brachial tightness of the tissues that are involved in the problem but often go unnoticed.”

Key Treatment Technique for Mid-Back and Neck Pain – Mid Thoracic PA Spinal Mobilization in supine

Key Treatment Technique for Mid-Back and Neck Pain – Mid Thoracic PA Spinal Mobilization in supine

We make a ton of training videos for our staff and other PTs around the world. We sometimes share them on our blog so those in pain can see how quickly our hands-on physical therapy can help provide relief so patients can get back to the active lifestyles they want and deserve.

If you are dealing with pain and would like to know how we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

Below is one such video showing an example of a spinal mobilization manual therapy technique.

Mid Thoracic PA Spinal Mobilization for Mid-Back and Neck pain, with patient in supine position.

 

 

 

 

The therapists at Carter Physiotherapy are miracle workers! A few treatments with them on my neck after it was aching and cracking for weeks on end and I have had zero pain since. Amazing. My neck hasn’t popped or cracked since I saw them. Thank you so much for taking the time to help me.

KARA R, AUSTIN, TX

If you’d like to schedule a call with one of our physical therapists Click Here. Or you can click here to send us an email.

Video Transcription

(please excuse grammatical errors and the conversational nature of the transcription):

I’m going to perform a very simple mobilization through the thoracic spine and the position of my hands is as follows: The two small fingers are going to be on the left side of her spinous processes. I’m going to bunch up my thenar eminence on the right side and then the spinous process will lay right in the middle.

Next, I’m going to do a general mobilization. There might be some pops. But I’m not going to be thrusting and going for pops. I’m just trying to gently move this area. Inform the patient of this, and ask them to let you know if it hurts at any point.

Let the patient lie on their back. Don’t let their arms cross at the forearms because we’re pushing and putting pressure through the arms, so that can hurt them if they’re crossed like that. So you place one elbow under the other. The patient must relax their back over my hand. Ask her to breathe in and out, relaxing gently.”

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