Why does my jaw pop when I yawn?

Why does my jaw pop when I yawn?

In today’s FAQ video, we answer the question “Why does my jaw pop when I yawn?” Watch below to hear our answer and leave any questions you may have in the comments section below.

If you are dealing with jaw pain and would like to know how we can help, call us at (512) 693-8849.

If you’d like to request a call with one of our Austin-area physical therapists, Click Here.

Or click here to send us an email.

Video Transcription [Please excuse grammatical errors due to the conversational nature of the video]:

Why does my jaw pop when I yawn?

On my first year of PT school, I worked at a TMJ or jaw specialty clinic. So, I got to see a ton of jaw patients, and I’ll try not to get too technical. If you feel like you’re having jaw pops when you yawn, it means… There are two joints with one bone in between. And when you open the top of the the mandible or the jaw bone, it glides forward. There’s this little thing called a meniscus or disc on top of the mandible that is supposed to glide with it as it opens.

What happens sometimes is that it will either slip off the meniscus, or much more commonly, that the meniscus is dislocated forward. And so it starts to glide and then pops off before colliding back and recapturing the disk, causing the pop you often hear. That’s usually what causes the pop. Often there’s a pop going out.

All that’s to say, a lot of people have popping jaws and it’s really not an issue. So even if there’s no pain associated with it, you might still want to get it checked out to see if it might become a painful issue. Problems, issues when it was painful—especially if you’re having an increase in the amount of popping or pop volume. At that point, you’re probably heading towards your jaw getting locked open or closed, which can be quite scary incident.

So if you’re having loud popping and it’s getting worse, then definitely get someone to check it out. (Click here to request a free call with one of our expert physical therapists.) But that is generally why sometimes your jaw pops when you yawn.

Thanks so much for joining us, and that’s it for this episode of “Frequently Asked Questions.”

But if you have any questions that you’d like us to answer about anything you’re dealing with, leave them in the comments below, and we’ll do more videos like this if we get enough people asking questions. Thank you.

 

Why does my wrist hurt when I do bicep curls?

Why does my wrist hurt when I do bicep curls?

In today’s FAQ video, we answer the question “Why do I have wrist pain when I do bicep curls?” Watch the video below to learn what’s behind that wrist pain. Please leave any questions you may have in the comments section below.

If you are dealing with wrist pain and would like to know how we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

If it’s after hours and you’d like to request a call with one of our Austin-area physical therapists, Click Here.

Or click here to send us an email.

Why do I have wrist pain when I do bicep curls?

 

I am 24 years old and ran into some soft tissue problems with my wrist May 2010.  After a month of exercising on my own and attempting to rehab it, I did not have much success.  I am a personal trainer, so recovering was important to me as I need my wrist to demonstrate almost every exercise I show to clients.

After one session with Jarod, the mobility of my wrist improved significantly.  I am now able to get through my job pain-free.  There is still work to be done; however, the results received from one session speak largely to the exemplar level of Manual Therapy at which they operate.

As with any treatment, do not expect to be immediately cured; although, do not be surprised if it turns out to be a rapid fix.

JOHN G,  AUSTIN, TX

Video Transcription [Please excuse grammatical errors due to the conversational nature of the video]:

Why do I have wrist pain when I curl?

I’m guessing you’re talking about curling weights, not curling in the Olympics!

It’s funny, my wrist actually does hurt when I curl. For me, it’s because the ligaments in the wrists are a little too loose. They allow too much movement when you put that kind of sheer force through. And if too much movement is allowed there, then it can cause some shifting and irritation.

That’s probably the most common reason a wrist would hurt with bicep curls. There are other things, from the shoulder to the bicep tendon that we probably see more commonly hurt with bicep curls… if there’s an issue with those.

Why does my lower back hurt when I run?

Why does my lower back hurt when I run?

In today’s FAQ video, we answer the question “Why do I have lower back pain when I run?” Watch the video below to learn what’s behind your pain. Leave any questions you may have in the comments section below.

If you are dealing with lower back pain and would like to know how we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

If it’s after hours and you’d like to request a call with one of our Austin-area physical therapists, Click Here.

Or click here to send us an email.

Why do I have lower back pain when I run?

 

 

What a cool experience! I wasn’t really sure what to expect and honestly was a little bit nervous that someone was going to want to change how I have been running for years. Immediately I felt comfortable with my therapist, he was friendly and listened to what I had to say about my running history and goals. His initial data gathering was very thorough and what I really liked was that he was very focused on what I wanted for my running goals. His approach of fixing issues before they begin by fixing form just makes sense. All levels of runners could benefit from this service. I really enjoyed the very detailed video analysis of my form. He pointed out a lot things that were happening during my stride that I had never really noticed or thought about before such as how to push off with my first and second toe, and also about how hamstring engagement can affect form. Overall I was really happy to see that I didn’t really need to change anything, and based on a history free of running injuries, this confirmed that. But, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and I fully believe that this could improve the longevity and enjoyment of running for all types of runners. Once my wife has her baby and picks up her mileage again she will be coming in for an analysis!

NICK S, AUSTIN TX

Video Transcription

[Please excuse grammatical errors due to the conversational nature of the video]:

Why does my lower back hurt when I run?

It depends. The patients that I typically see with low back pain are runners. Usually they’re women who have really arched backs when they run. Their pelvises are so far forward, and they’re very upward. They’re taught that they need to have a really upright posture.

They do it like almost excessively, right? Because that’s the way they think they’re supposed to—to present yourself with a nice upright posture. So they run like that, and they typically have really tight hip flexors, and their low backs are very tight while sitting.

They are always asking me questions like, “Why am I sitting? What are you doing?” Well, you’re supposed to arch your back. When you put your hand at their backs, patients would say “Hey, stop being creepy. I came here for my big toe.”

It’s all connected.

But I see that a lot. Usually my female patients who have just really significant low back problems complain a lot. When they hold that position, they take a lot of force. And when they run, it’s kind of a jarring kind of look. It’s not a smooth, easy fluid motion. That’s what I see a lot of in our clinic.

A running analysis can help identify such problems.

Why do I have calf pain when I run?

Why do I have calf pain when I run?

In today’s FAQ video, we answer the question “What do I have calf pain when I run?” Watch the video below to hear our expert physical therapists explain what’s behind your calf pain. Leave any questions you may have in the comments section below.

If you are dealing with calf pain and would like to know how we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

If it’s after hours and you’d like to request a call with one of our Austin-area physical therapists, Click Here.

Or click here to send us an email.

Why do I have calf pain when I run?

 

I had a run analysis with a therapist at Carter PT and it was great! I noticed a difference in my run as soon as I walked out of the appointment. Definitely worth it to get a run analysis with him if you are planning on doing any kind of running. I highly recommend him!

STEPHANIE M, AUSTIN TX

Video Transcription

[Please excuse grammatical errors due to the conversational nature of the video]:

“Why do my calves hurt when I run?

I see this a lot with my runners when I have patients that come in here. They’re kind of confused because they have these giant calves and they’re like “I do calf raises all the time.”

You look at them and reply, “I think you have this problem because you only really run with your calves.” And they tend to run with the balls of their feet, tending to be kind of bouncy and pushing outside of their feet.

It put a lot of strain on the outside of those calves. So my calf runners are always confused why they have this problem because they’re not really using their hamstrings and glutes, especially the hamstrings.

So you’ll see people with these big huge calves and you test their hamstrings and they cramp or are weak. These people would get tired after maybe five or ten reps. So that’s a big portion of what I see people with calf issues, as they just use their calves way too much.

But they are able to work that muscle group more than others. So you should have them change their form and strength and focus on the hamstrings and glutes, but especially hamstrings. It is such a big part. The more you can pick up with your feet with your hamstrings, the better your calf pain will be. I’ve had calf strains in the past and that’s been my issue. I just worked them too much. But when I really started engaging my hamstrings much more, the calf strain just kind of went away.”

Why do I have knee pain when I squat?

Why do I have knee pain when I squat?

In today’s FAQ video, we answer the question “Why do I have knee pain when I squat?”

Watch the video to learn what’s behind your knee pain from the expert physical therapists at Carter PT. Leave any questions you may have in the comments section below.

If you are dealing with knee pain and would like to know how we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

If it’s after hours and you’d like to request a call with one of our Austin-area physical therapists, Click Here.

Or click here to send us an email.

Why do I have knee pain when I squat?

My therapist at Carter PT does absolutely excellent work! His bedside manner is friendly and engaged but not nosy. He is genuinely interested in helping his patients recover. I had knee pain for six years and after once session with him, it’s completely gone. I think that’s likely a unique situation, as I’m relatively healthy, young, and strong already. However, I am sure most of it was due to his expertise. The office is well managed and patients are received in a timely manner.

MOLLY W, AUSTIN TX

 

Video Transcription

[Please excuse grammatical errors due to the conversational nature of the video]:

So why does why does my knee hurt when I squat?

Well, that’s another tricky question. It could be a million different things. It really depends on squat mechanics, how the joint is moving. Also, just the strength of various muscles are factors. Sometimes muscles and the hips are actually weak, and they allow the knees to move in awkward ways.

When you squat, if you’ve had an ankle sprain or have stiff ankles, the knees sometimes don’t move correctly. Then you put additional strain on your knees that could also result in back pain. People can also bend forward too much when they squat. Man, the list goes on.

Is there anything else you want to add to that?

It’s a pretty good list. But yeah, there’s a lot of them. I mean, we all squat, right? We all sit in chairs. We all get down in chairs. So it’s a skill set that I think everybody should be proficient at. But yeah, identifying the different factors is important to help in resolving that. 

Why does my elbow hurt when I straighten it?

Why does my elbow hurt when I straighten it?

In today’s FAQ video, we answer the question “Why do I have elbow pain when I straighten my arm?” We also explain what’s behind tennis elbow or golf elbow and why it’s important to discover exactly what’s causing your pain. Watch the video below to learn what’s behind your pain from the expert physical therapists at Carter PT. Leave any questions you may have in the comments section below.

If you are dealing with elbow injury and would like to know how we can help, call or text us at (512) 693-8849.

If it’s after hours and you’d like to request a call with one of our Austin-area physical therapists, Click Here.

Or click here to send us an email.

Why do I have elbow pain when I straighten my arm?

 

I highly recommend Carter Physiotherapy. I went there last year when I started having some pain in my wrist and elbow. I was surprised how well they found the exact muscles that were bothering me and had some interesting techniques to fix the issue. Some say it’s a little painful but I gladly put up with a little pain to get rid of what was becoming a chronic condition.

After the first session, most of the at-rest pain was gone and after the second, the stress-related pain left too. They suggested ways to correct the condition from reoccurring and I haven’t had a problem since.

JEREMY K,  AUSTIN TX

 

Video Transcription

[Please excuse grammatical errors due to the conversational nature of the video]:

Why does my elbow hurt when I straighten it?

This is something interesting one. Well how about this: “Why does my elbow hurt when I squeeze or open something?”

Sometimes, it’s so bad that as you’re straightening it makes it painful, too. Tennis elbow is kind of like what we were talking about earlier relating to shin splints. There’s a million things that can be involved in it: everything from up in the neck to, you know, decreased range of motion at the wrist and fingers. All of which have fascial or myofascial lines that connect through where we typically have tennis elbow, which is on the outside elbow or inside elbow is called golfer’s elbow. That’s even though most people that have those things aren’t tennis players or golfers.

Just anatomically, all of the muscles on them come into what we call the wrist extensors and finger extensors. There are a ton of muscles, and they all come to this one common tendon. So it’s a broad amount of pulling all going to this tiny little tendon. So that’s one of the reasons it’s such a common place to get irritated. But again, there can be causes from the neck and midback all the way down to the fingertips that are associated with it.

Treatment approach

That’s again why, if you’re dealing with a stubborn case of tennis elbow, you need to make sure you’re seeing a good practitioner. Someone who’s not just spending five minutes evaluating it and wanting to stick a needle in it and put cortisone or something like that. These methods are not shown to be very effective across the board.

But we aim to identify all of the factors associated with this problem and let’s treat every one of them. Because otherwise the issue can become really stubborn and hard to treat.

Tendons have a pretty poor blood supply, so they just take longer to heal. If you strain a bicep or something like that, you give it a couple of days, you will feel better. But the tendons are tricky to treat just because the healing process just takes longer.

It just takes patience and a good understanding from your therapist to know that we need to load the tendon appropriately and get it to adapt. But that might take some time. But as long as you’re up front with people, I think people will get on board. Because tennis elbo is one thing that once they start to feel good at some point and they get back their activities, and they flare back up. It’s important to know that this is a process that can take some time. 

It’s one of the things that usually takes longer to treat.

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