Tanya Streeter free diver: life lessons from 500 feet below the surfaceFrom 1997 to 2007, Tanya Streeter was a competitive free-diver and broke a HUGE 10 World Records. While she no longer free dives competitively, she now does work as a TV presenter and film maker, using her skill to promote ocean awareness. In this interview, we cover a broad range of topics from funny to touching to serious. Tanya is incredibly passionate about health, particularly where plastics are concerned. She now works to educate the public on the health risks of using, drinking from, and cooking with plastics, as well as how plastics impact the oceans around the world.

In this episode, we chat about:

 

  • How she got her start in free diving
  • What drove her to pursue world records and what she learned in the process
  • The role Tanya’s emotions play in her movement through life
  • How free diving differs as a sport than all others
  • The difference between physical and mental boundaries when free diving
  • Differences among schools/disciplines of free diving
  • The function of breathing in free diving, including “breathe up” and “last breath”
  • The training involved in free diving and the importance of each type: Land-based and wet
  • Why Tanya believes it’s better to progress slowly towards reaching deeper depths
  • Her struggles with static apnea
  • Safety protocols currently in place to prevent free diving deaths and Tanya’s black out during a competition
  • How to segment different aspects of life to fully be present in each (and the differences between men and women in doing so)
  • What brought Tanya and her husband to Austin
  • Why Tanya finds diving in Lake Travis scarier than diving in the ocean
  • One of her most stressful dives and the thought she had during the dive that lead her to first consider retirement from record events
  • How sponsorship changed her relationship with free diving
  • What Tanya means when she speaks about what she found at the end of the rope
  • Her passion for ocean conservancy and the threat of plastics in the water
  • Easy ways to expand on “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” to promote environmental progress and toxicity of products we use every day

 

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